Feeding Time at the River

Feeding Time at the River

It was another glorious sunny day for mid November and we had been out for a drive in the county and then stopped at a section of the waterfront trail that we rarely walk along.  As we came over the bridge from the county we could see the huge flocks of Canada Geese and noticed some swans nearby too.

The water in the river was so still, just perfect for photographing reflections in the water.  Here are some of the swans as they head into the harbour looking for good places for lunch.

Pushing their long, graceful necks into the water they were able to find lots of good things to nibble on.

I just can’t resist taking all sorts of photos of the swans.

This has to be one of my favourites as it pulls it head from the water.  I was even able to capture the water beading off its beak.

I’m sharing with Tuesday TweetsWild Bird WednesdayI’d Rather B Birdin’,

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I hope you have time to leave a comment.  I’ll be sure to pop over and visit you in the next few days.

Walking by the Bay

Walking by the Bay

Last week on Monday we went for a walk down by the bay.  This is the Bay of Quinte in Lake Ontario.  This is one of our favourite walks and usually in the warmer weather we view lots of geese, swans, ducks, turtles, herons, cormorants and osprey.  At this time of the year the wildlife is limited as many of the birds have moved to somewhere a bit warmer.  There were still lots of mallard ducks in the chilly water.

One thing we really noticed was how low the water was.  The bay is suffering from the extremely hot and dry weather we had this past summer.

This area is usually brimming with water.  In fact the 2 spits that go out into the water aren’t usually visible except for little bits and the ducks and cormorants and herons are usually vying for the best rock to perch on.

This area is usually submerged in the water.  This is the spot where we usually can guarantee to see lots of ducks over the winter.  But with the water level so low I’m not sure about this year.  We’ll be checking over the winter months.

This pond area usually has water right up to the grass.  All the tree stumps and root systems were visible.  This is where I spotted the black crowned night heron a couple of years ago.

Miscanthus

Miscanthus

We added some new perennial grasses to the garden this past season.  There is a front triangle garden that was full of perennial bloomers like heliopsis, coreopsis, purple coneflower and lots of oriental and asiatic lilies.

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It was a high maintenance garden.  When I had my knee surgery  in 2011 I knew I couldn’t keep up with the constant deadheading.  And the lilies had those awful red lily beetles that meant “pick and squish” on a daily basis.  With alot of sadness the lilies were dug up and those beetles never appeared again.

Here is a photo of the garden in 2009 with the lilies in full bloom.  I sure do miss them.  The thing is that they were never replaced and the garden seemed to go downhill from there.  It was hard to keep up with the deadheading  to keep a constant show of blooms.  So early in the gardening season of 2012 I decided they all had to go.  I belong to a Freecycle group and giving plants away is not a problem in our area.  I had plenty of takers and could of given them away 10 times over. This is a north facing garden and across the road are farm fields that give us a wonderful view.  That’s my rural mailbox on the other side of the road.

I love the feathery plumes and they are so interesting to watch in the wind.   These will add winter interest to the garden.  I’ve made sure there are leaves around the base as the garden center said that would help with protection over the winter months.

Here is a recent photo of the same garden with the three new miscanthus plants.  There is also a new yucca plant that was a garden share from a friend. (lower right corner).  The plants that remain from the previous garden are sedum, purple coneflower and a few globe allium.  I’ve also added some new low daylilies and a transplant of another low grass we had in another part of the garden.  This was taken before the leaves were added for a winter blanket.  I’ll be watching this garden carefully next spring and looking for signs of growth.

Did youu plant anything new in your garden this year?

Button Trees

Button Trees

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I’ve come across this cute craft a a few different craft shows this year.  I did a search on the internet and found all sorts of places have this idea posted but I couldn’t seem to find out where it originated from.  I even found them for sale on etsy.  I think the idea might of originally come from the Martha Stewart website with a slightly different idea.  It’s never too early to start Christmas crafting.

Here is the perfect reason to hunt through the button jars or tins that hold your collection of buttons.  If you don’t have any buttons you can purchase them by the bag at craft stores for a reasonable price.

You need 10 buttons with holes instead of shanks.  This makes it easier to thread them together.  The buttons should also be in varying sizes that will stack together in a pyramid shape.  The colour doesn’t really matter but you could group them together in colour shades if you wish.  You also need 3 smaller buttons, preferably the same colour, for the trunk of the tree.  You also need a needle and fishing line to string them together and a loop of string about 2 inches long.

Here is my selection all sorted and ready to make.  I just need to find some star beads for the tops of the trees and thread them together.  You could use fishing line, or a thin but strong thread.  You start at one side (make sure you have a needle that will fit through all the holes on the buttons) and thread all the buttons on. Then once you are at the top, add a loop and start to thread down the buttons.  Tie a knot firmly at the bottom.  You could use string or cord for your loop.  Be sure the loop is big enough to hang onto a branch of your Christmas tree.

Here are the 2 button trees that I purchased at the craft sale.  The young man that made these was selling them for $1 each and donating all the money to the fire fighters food drive.

More tree ideas:

Have you seen some of my other ideas for Christmas decorating?

The Wild Pacific

The Wild Pacific

Remembering Tofino, British Columbia.

On a windy, wet and stormy day in November 2011, a year ago today,  we visited Long Beach by Tofino, British Columbia.

The wild Pacific Ocean was at its best during the storm.

The waves were crashing onto the beach.

Along with lots of driftwood there was a huge tree that had washed up on shore.
This is the type of weather the surfers love and there were lots of them in the ocean braving the weather to get that perfect ride.  There were also lots of other people walking the beach and taking in the magnificence of the Pacific Ocean.


These photos look like they were taken in black and white but they weren’t.   It was such and overcast day.  I’ll share some other photos in another post where the colour is evident.

We weren’t one of the surfers but we did take the opportunity to walk in the Pacific Ocean, even if we did have our boots on!

Fabric Trees

Fabric Trees

Christmas ideas are sneaking in on the Crafty Side, it’s never too early to start.

Here are some cute, little, “tree”mendous decorations.  You can use them to hang on the tree, or hang on handles or door knobs.  You could even stitch them onto a long ribbon and make bunting or a garland.  I made these a few years ago and have used them to decorate in different ways.

making fabric trees at craftygardener.ca

They are very simple to make out of some fabric, a bit of batting, some trim and ribbon.

making fabric trees at craftygardener.ca

You cut three square – one 3 inch, one 2.5 inch and one 2 inch from the fabric.  Vary the pattern on the fabric so each part of the tree has a different pattern, or cut them all from the same material. The choice is up to you, you are only limited by your own imagination.

making fabric trees at craftygardener.ca

Fold each square to form a triangle.  Cut a triangle piece of quilt batting slightly smaller than each of the fabric triangles and pin it inside each triangle.

making fabric trees at craftygardener.ca
making fabric trees at craftygardener.ca

Sew each  triangle shape closed.  Glue coloured bead ribbon or coloured cord along each edge and a sequin star at the top.

making fabric trees at craftygardener.ca

Now it is time to glue it all together. Place the biggest triangle on the bottom add the second and overlap the base onto the point just a bit, and then the smallest triangle on the top.  Make a loop out of ribbon and it is ready to hang.

making fabric trees at craftygardener.ca

I pinned them onto the back of a window topper curtain in the kitchen and they make a festive garland by the window.

making fabric trees at craftygardener.ca

Are you making any decorations for the holidays?  It’s never too early to start.

Have you seen some of my other ideas for Christmas decorating?

More tree ideas:

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