Jenny is Creeping

Jenny is Creeping

The creeping Jenny or  lysimachia nummularia, has been creeping and creeping outside the pot!  I planted lots of small shoots into kettles, teapots, teacups, cups, small pots and more about mid May.  Many years ago I must of planted a bit in the back wild garden and forgot all about it.  It has been spreading ever since.  So this spring I dug up lots of the little plants and used them in containers.  Adding this plant to containers is a great way to contain it.

2013 creeping jenny1

Towards the end of June many little yellow flowers appeared on the long trailing stems.  I’m certain I didn’t appreciate this plant in the garden but now it has been added to hanging baskets, tipsy pots and buckets and all sorts of little containers the long, trailing stems are lovely.

2013 creeping jenny pot2

One of my favourites is this sunflower kettle (given to me by a friend once it was no longer good for boiling water).  It started out with a few stems and then it started to grow and grow and grow.  It was moved from a shelf on the ladder planter up to the top rung so that it could trail over the sides.

2013-creeping-jenny-leaf1.jpg

It is also known as moneywort, twopenny grass or herb twopence, perhaps because the leaves are in twos.  The shiny foliage will fill in spaces in hanging baskets and it is also used as a ground cover in shady areas.  It can be considered invasive in the garden.

2013-creeping-jennybloom1.jpg

The flowers are yellow and small and you don’t need to deadhead them.

2013-creeping-jennybloom2.jpg

They don’t last very long, so enjoy them as soon as they appear.

2013-creeping-jenny-pot1.jpg

It has been a good choice to add into the strawberry pot.  I’ll be over wintering these containers in the garage and hope that they survive the winter and grow well next year.  And if they don’t … well I know just where to go in the garden to dig some new plants in the spring.

So for C at ABC Wednesday I’m sharing the creeping jenny,

More from The Gardener Side

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the gardens  … whimsy in the garden

Mini Conch Shell Twirler Pattern

Mini Conch Shell Twirler Pattern

 

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With the print friendly option you can choose how much or how little you want to print, just mouse over the text for the option to delete. Images can be included or not.

This mini conch shell is perfect for a keychain or make several to create a mobile.  This was a little craft we made when I was a Girl Guide leader.

This pattern is ©Crafty Gardener and my not be sold or posted on any other site. Please share the link so others may visit.

miniconch

-pipecleaner
-14 count plastic canvas

You need 7 count plastic canvas cut into 16 strips – 1 hole x 12 holes. This is the perfect project to use up the odd bits of plastic canvas that you just hate to throw away.
Twist one end of half a pipe cleaner to form bump.
Thread the end holes on a pipe cleaner.
When all 16 are threaded, take the bottom strip and loop the very first hole (opposite end that is on pipe cleaner) onto the pipe cleaner.
Continue with the remaining strips.
The shell will form as you get all 16 threaded onto the pipe cleaner. Twist the other end when finished.

This is the perfect size to hang from a keyring or you could make several and hang from a base to make a mobile.

I am not a professional pattern writer or designer.  I just like to share patterns with other crafters.

Please don’t complain if there is a mistake, perhaps you can find the solution and share it with me so that I can then share it with others.  Please don’t ask me for a video on a specific pattern …. that all takes time and this is done out of the goodness of my heart.  Sometimes it seems the more you make available the more some folks want and demand! 

Conch Shell Twirler Pattern

Conch Shell Twirler Pattern

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

With the print friendly option you can choose how much or how little you want to print, just mouse over the text for the option to delete. Images can be included or not but due to formatting on the post they may show up all over the place.

Conch Shell Twirler

This pattern is ©Crafty Gardener and my not be sold or posted on any other site. Please share the link so others may visit.

Twirlers or whirlygigs are so much fun to have in the garden. Even the gentle breeze will make them twirl.  I make them from plastic canvas, wire, beads and a fishing swivel.

conch shellaa

Materials:

-wire from a coathanger that is about 16 inches long
-fishing swivel
-fishing line
-clothes peg
-interlocking craft beads
-plastic canvas in your choice of colours, use 2 or 3 colours and alternate the strips

Directions:

Cut your plastic canvas five holes wide and 70 holes long. You will need 27 strips.
Twist a loop in the end of the wire and thread three beads on.
Put one strip of pc onto the wire. Alternate beads and plastic canvas until all 27 strips are on the wire.
Take the free end of your first PC strip, and thread it on the wire.
Add a bead and move on to the next PC strip.
Continue until all strips are used.
End with 3 beads.
Bend a hook in the wire, add the swivel, and close.
Fasten a length of fishing line fastened to a clothes peg.
It should look something like a conch shell

I am not a professional pattern writer or designer.  I just like to share patterns with other crafters.

Please don’t complain if there is a mistake, perhaps you can find the solution and share it with me so that I can then share it with others.  Please don’t ask me for a video on a specific pattern …. that all takes time and this is done out of the goodness of my heart.  Sometimes it seems the more you make available the more some folks want and demand! 

Conch Shell Twirler

Conch Shell Twirler

~

Twirlers or whirlygigs are so much fun to have in the garden. Even the gentle breeze will make them twirl.  I make them from plastic canvas, wire, beads and a fishing swivel.

A conch shell twirler/wind spinner/whirlygig is a good one to start with.

conch shell twirler from craftygardener.ca

A print friendly version of this pattern is here.

Materials:

  • wire from a coathanger that is about 16 inches long
  • fishing swivel
  • fishing line
  • clothes peg
  • interlocking craft beads
  • plastic canvas in your choice of colours, use 2 or 3 colours and alternate the strips

Directions:

  • Cut your plastic canvas five holes wide and 70 holes long. You will need 27 strips.
  • Twist a loop in the end of the wire and thread three beads on.
  • Put one strip of pc onto the wire. Alternate beads and plastic canvas until all 27 strips are on the wire.
  • Take the free end of your first PC strip, and thread it on the wire.
    Add a bead and move on to the next PC strip.
  • Continue until all strips are used.
  • End with 3 beads.
  • Bend a hook in the wire, add the swivel, and close.
  • Fasten a length of fishing line fastened to a clothes peg.
  • It should look something like a conch shell

This mini conch shell is perfect for a keychain or make several to create a mobile.  This was a little craft we made when I was a Girl Guide leader. Lots of other Guiding crafts are here.

miniconch

Materials and Instructions:

  • You need 7 count plastic canvas cut into 16 strips – 1 hole x 12 holes.
  • This is the perfect project to use up the odd bits of plastic canvas that you just hate to throw away.
  • Twist one end of half a pipe cleaner to form bump.
  • Thread the end holes on a pipe cleaner.
  • When all 16 are threaded, take the bottom strip and loop the very first hole (opposite end that is on pipe cleaner) onto the pipe cleaner.
  • Continue with the remaining strips.
  • The shell will form as you get all 16 threaded onto the pipe cleaner.
  • Twist the other end when finished.

This is the perfect size to hang from a keyring or you could make several and hang from a base to make a mobile.

A print friendly version of the mini conch shell twirler is here.

Other twirler ideas:

the gardener side at craftygardener.ca
The Fence Garden in July

The Fence Garden in July

It’s that time of month to compare how the fence garden is growing.   During 2012 I took a photo about the same time each month and now I’m taking one each month during 2013.

It is very interesting to see the comparison of plants, of the whimsy added to this area, and how much fence you can actually see.

There are a few noticeable changes from 2012 to 2013 to the garden decor and there is a bit more fence showing last year to this year.

2012fencegdnjuly1a

The flag in 2012 had a watering can on it.  This flag is over the front door this year.  I also have the re’find’ mushrooms that are in the windmill garden this year.  Hank the heron has been moved to the bridge garden this year … closer to the water with a chance of catching fish!

2013fencegdnjuly1a

The garden flag is in shades of mauve with a hummingbird on it.  Mr. Stringy Stumpy was added this year (right).  The plants all seem a bit taller this year, with a couple of jerusalem artichokes being the tallest.  The wild asters are very tall (on the right of the photo), perhaps they were cut out last year.  The Catherine Woodbury daylies are in full bloom this year.  The beebalm is blooming in both photos and this years one has some mallow in bloom.

I believe the difference in the height of the flowers is that the photo from 2012 was taken during the first week of July and the 2013 photo was taken towards the end of the month.

You can see a monthly comparison of the fence garden by clicking here.

More from The Gardener Side

plants … seed info … veggies & herbs … bulbs, corms, tubers

the gardens  … whimsy in the garden

Round Dishcloth Pattern

Round Dishcloth Pattern

Round dish cloth pattern from craftygardener.ca

 

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Click to print.

With the print friendly option you can choose how much or how little you want to print, just mouse over the text for the option to delete. Images can be included or not.

This is another simple round crochet dishcloth made with a 5 mm hook.

round crochet dishcloths at craftygardener.ca

Round 1 – Ch 6, join with slip stitch to make ring.

Round 2 – Ch 3 (first dc), 8 dc in ring, joing last to first with slip stitch.

Round 3 – Ch 3, dc in same stitch, 2 dc in each dc around ring, should have 18 dc when finished.

Round 4 – Ch 3, dc in same stitch, 2 dc in each dc, join last to first with slip stitch, should have 36 dc when finished.

Round 5 – Ch 3, dc in same stitch, *dc in next stitch,  2 dc in next stitch*  repeat around and join last to first with slip stitch

Round 6 – Ch 3, dc in same stitch, *dc in next 2 stitches,  2 dc in next stitch*  repeat around and join last to first with slip stitch

Round 7 – sc around, adding an extra sc every now and then so that the cloth stays flat.

-or make shell stitches (3 dc) *slip stitch in next dc, skip 2 dc, 3 dc in next stitch, skip 2 dc, slip stitch in next dc* repeat to end

-or make larger shell stitches (5 dc)

I am not a professional pattern writer or designer.  I just like to share patterns with other crafters.

Please don’t complain if there is a mistake, perhaps you can find the solution and share it with me so that I can then share it with others.