Yummy Leftover Turkey

Yummy Leftover Turkey

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Thanksgiving in Canada has come and gone.  It was a fantastic time to get together with family and enjoy love, laughter and a lovely meal.
What do you do with leftover turkey?   Here are a couple of my favourite leftover recipes.
First is turkey soup.
homemade turkey soup at craftygardener.ca
There was plenty of cooked turkey that was cut into small pieces. I cubed 6 medium potatoes, sliced a couple of stalks of celery and diced up some carrots and sweet onions.  I added some frozen peas and green beans and some pot barley.  All of this went into about 8 cups of water and a couple of veggie stock cubes and was cooked in a large pot till the veggies were soft.  You can of course use chicken stock or home made turkey stock.  Many folks boil the turkey bones for the broth but that just adds an extra step and I’m all for simplicity.  When it is nearly finished cooking I add in some chicken Bisto gravy for a bit of added flavour.
homemade turkey soup at craftygardener.ca

Individual portions of the soup are put into freezer bags and stored in the upright freezer for enjoying later.  There is nothing like a bowl of homemade soup on a chilly day.

You can add whatever veggies you prefer.  Rice can be substituted for the potatoes.  The potatoes and pot barley will make it a thicker soup.

The next is yummy turkey and potato recipe.

turkey & potato pie for the freezer at craftygardener.ca

Cut up the turkey and mix with frozen veggies.  This time I used peans and beans but you could use whatever you have on hand.  Make the mashed potatoes.  I divide the turkey and veggies mixture between 4 foil dishes from the dollar store, and top with mashed potatoes.  I do mix up some gravy and pour a couple of tablespoons over the turkey mixture before adding the mashed potatoes.  Seal on the lid and add details and pop into the freezer to enjoy later in the winter.

turkey & potatoes for the freezer at craftygardener.ca

When you are ready to cook one, remove the lid and place in a 350 degree oven for about 30 minutes or till the top of the mashed potatoes browns off.
Slide out onto your plate and enjoy.

Yummy!

I’m sharing with  Souper Sunday, and Weekend Cooking.

Printable recipes for turkey soup and turkey & potatoes.

teacups

Some other ‘soup’er Sunday recipes to warm you up.

A Tangled Web

A Tangled Web

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Recently I finished the latest Mike Martin book, A Tangled Web, which was the 6th in the Sgt Windflower mystery series.   Mike is a Canadian author, born in Newfoundland and now living in Ottawa.  Sgt. Winston Windflower, a Cree from northern Alberta, is an RCMP officer stationed in Grand Bank, Newfoundland.

Before starting A Tangled Web I re-read the first 5 books to reacquaint me with the story, characters and location. It feels like getting reacquainted with good friends.  I have thoroughly enjoyed this series and would highly recommend it to you.

A Tangled Web y Mike Martin

At the end of the last book Winston married Sheila and this book continues on with their life in Grand Bank.  The story starts out with a little girl going missing.  She was a curious little girl and ended up exploring inside a transport truck, which closed up and started its journey without realizing it had precious cargo inside.  The RCMP are called in to investigate the disappearance.  Things quickly turn worse … a murder, missing funds, a corrupt local official, the shooting of an officer and a bit more and Windflower sets out to unravel the tangled web.  He also starts to evaluate his life as an RCMP officer as it gets closer to the birth of his first child.

An indication of the future for Winston and Sheila is presented when the local B&B is up for sale.  Both Winston and Sheila love to cook and enjoy food and I love reading about the meals, especially the traditional Newfoundland ones.

Good friends, good food, and a good family help to have a good ending.  I’m already looking forward to the next book, when the baby arrives and we find out if the new business venture is a success.

The Sgt. Windflower mystery series by Mike Martin

I love reading books set in Canada by Canadians and this is one series I highly recommend to you.  You can read about the Sgt. Windflower Mysteries on Mike’s site or visit his Facebook page for the latest happenings.  You can also read my reviews of the Sgt. Windflower series.  I’m glad to have the series on my own bookshelf, knowing I can pick them up to read anytime I want to connect to Windflower, his friends, his family and Newfoundland.

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Mike did a guest post for me awhile ago and you can read it here.  

book line by craftygardener.ca

Other book reviews:

Sgt. Windflower Books:

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‘Soup’er Sunday – Parsnip and Apple Soup

‘Soup’er Sunday – Parsnip and Apple Soup

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With the onset of cooler Fall weather I’ve been making different soups, some to eat now and some for the freezer for those colder winter days.  A new soup for me to try this year was parsnip and apple soup.  I found this recipe at The English Kitchen and there is a link to the printable recipe there.  As usual I tweek recipes to suit me.  This meant leaving out the salt and pepper, only using part of a really big sweet onion, and adding a veggie stock cube to the water.

Parsnips aren’t everyone’s choice for a vegetable, but you have to be open minded and give them a try. Maybe it is an acquired taste.  Maybe it’s a British taste.  Another way I love parsnips is roasted with a few other veggies in the oven.

parsnip and apple soup made at craftygardener.ca

You need parsnips, onions, apples, vegetable stock and seasoning to taste.  The recipe calls for cooking apples which are almost non existent to find around here so I used Gala apples, and they gave the soup a nice sweet taste.  You could use whatever variety of apple you prefer.
parsnip and apple soup made at craftygardener.ca
Peel and chop the 3 ingredients.  Lightly cook the parsnips and onions in the oil, add the apples, water and veggie stock cube and cover and cook till tender.   Cool and put in the blender to make smooth.  Add the milk and blend again and it is ready to heat and serve.
parsnip and apple soup made at craftygardener.ca
It was delicious with some flax and quinoa bread and some chunks of cheese.  The rest was frozen for those cold winter days.  Two cups of soup is a good measure for fitting into the freezer bags.   I’ve tried freezing soup in various methods using round and square containers but now I use a medium size freezer bags as they lay flat and don’t take up as much room.  And they defrost a lot quicker.
parsnip and apple soup made at craftygardener.ca
There is nothing better than a hot bowl of soup on a cold winter day.
Have you enjoyed a delicious bowl of soup lately?  What is your favourite?
I’ve always called my posts “Soup”er Sunday and now I’ve found a link party to join with and it’s also called Souper Sunday, perfect for joining. I’m also sharing with Weekend Cooking.

teacups

Some other ‘soup’er Sunday recipes to warm you up.

parsnip & apple / leek & potato / turkey soup / ham & potato / bean soup / sausage & bean / sweet potato & carrot / potato / green pea

The Life Way Shawl

The Life Way Shawl

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I recently completed a test pattern of the Life Way Shawl by Amy of lovemademyhome..   This was a nice pattern to follow and repeated the same rows, so once I had figured out how to do the different squares I didn’t need to keep checking back with the pattern.

Life Way Shawl by lovemademyhome at craftygardener.ca

I used Austermann Step 6 yarn from Grey Heron, our new local lys.  This one was in many of my favourite colours of greys, greens, rust and a bit of beige.  It’s a worsted weight yarn and was lovely and soft to work with.

Life Way Shawl by lovemademyhome at craftygardener.ca

It’s a corner to corner pattern, or C2C, starting at the point and each row increases by one square.

Life Way Shawl by lovemademyhome at craftygardener.ca

There were two sections of open work in the shawl, which came roughly in the middle.

Life Way Shawl by lovemademyhome at craftygardener.ca

Here is the finished shawl with straight sides and the pattern of the stitches makes a nice top row.  You can, of course, make this shawl any length you want, just by adding more rows.  The finished pattern was about 170 cm x 72 cm.  The pattern doesn’t call for any edging but I think I just might add some of my own at a later date.

a crochet shawl at craftygardener.ca

Now the weather has cooled down my shawls are getting lots of use.

Right now I’m working on a mermaid tail and a shark tail, both blankets/afghans for the grandkids out west.  I’m not sure if I mentioned it but we are heading out to Victoria at the beginning of December and staying till early January.  This will be our first Christmas with them out there and we are really looking forward to it.  We will really miss our family here in Ontario but have already decided that the weekend after we return we will celebrate Christmas with them.  That means two Christmas dinners and two lots of presents.  Christmas doesn’t always have to be in December 25 but on the day you are available to all get together and celebrate. Last year we celebrated Christmas at the end of September when we were out west.  Twice the fun last year and twice the fun this year.

Other shawls:

I’m sharing with The Really Crafty Link Party and  Hookin on Hump Day.

the crafty side of Crafty Gardener
Summer Flies Shawl

Summer Flies Shawl

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How summer flies?  It just seems like the season started and now we are into Fall, and the beginning of October.  This summer was hot, humid and extremely dry.  The gardens didn’t do as well and the grass dried up very early in the season.  The afternoons were sometimes unbearable to be outside, even in the shade.

I started this green shawl last year after returning from our trip to British Columbia but I never got around to showing the finished item.

The pattern is called Summer Flies and is a quick pattern to knit up on a 5 mm circular needles, the longer the better.  You can purchase the pattern at Revelry however I was lucky to get it free a couple of years ago when it was first introduced.  The pattern is knit in 7 sections and I use my row counter to keep track of where I am.  It works up quickly.

summer flies knitting shawl made at craftygardener.ca

The yarn I used for the green one was Berroco Weekend.  Previously I had knitted one in white.  You’ll see from the photos that the white one turned out to be a big bigger than the green one.  The reason for this was I didn’t have quite as much green yarn as needed so I made the final section a few rows shorter than the pattern called for.

knitted Summer Flies shawl at craftygardener.ca

I love wearing shawls now that the cooler Fall evenings are here, and along with these two I have a granny stripe one and a white triangular one.

knitted Summer Flies shawl at craftygardener.ca

After after our trip this year I’m just starting another one in white.  This is a commissioned item for someone who wants to give it as a Christmas gift.  I’m using Red Heart soft yarn for this one.  This is a new yarn to me and it certainly feels much softer than the regular Red Heart yarn, which I only use now for some of my bags as I find it isn’t as soft as I once remember.

white summer flies shawl at craftygardener.ca
embroideryline1a

More shawls:

Fall-ing into October

Fall-ing into October

We are into a new season now.  September finished off with a really hot spell, in fact some of the days were hotter than the in July and August.  A quick rain storm abruptly brought that weather to an end and in a matter of minutes the temperature started dropping down.

a relaxed squirrel at craftygardener.ca

It was so hot the squirrel was relaxing under the back tree.

The garden has been un-decorated and all stored away in the garage and shed.  I planted up a new couple of new yucca plants that I had grown from some root when a big plant got moved.

new yucca plants grown from pieces of root at craftygardener.ca

Looking way up, the Jerusalem artichokes are finally blooming.  That plants are so tall, making the small blooms look dwarfed on the top of the stems.

Jerusalem artichokes blooming at craftygardener.ca

We are enjoying as many walks down by the bay as we can fit in before the weather changes too much.  The heron is a favourite subject to photograph and I’m getting in as many shots as possible before it leaves for the winter.

the heron down by the bay taken by craftygardener.ca

Chippy has been scurrying around and stashing up on food for the long winter months ahead.  Here he is pausing for a brief moment to nibble on a seed.  Some of the winter birds have returned … nuthatch, chickadees and the white crowned sparrows have been passing through.  I guess I had better get busy and make some all season suet.

Chippy enjoying a break from gathering seeds for the winter at craftygardener.ca

I don’t think the Fall colours are as spectacular this year, perhaps because of the drought or the heat during September.  This is a photo taken on one of our walks by the bay.

Fall colours by craftygardener.ca

Thanksgiving (in Canada) is coming up soon and the turkey is defrosting and getting ready for cooking.   I’ve been doing up lots of veggies for the freezer so we have an abundant supply over the winter.  I’ve also been making some soups, a couple of new ones were parsnips and apple along with carrot and sweet potato.  I’ll share the recipes soon.  Happy Thanksgiving to our my Canadian friends and family.

I’m getting in list making and planning mode as we are heading to British Columbia at the beginning of December and won’t be returning till early January of 2018.  This will be our first time spending actual Christmas with our family and grandkids out west.  With this visit it will mean we have been out there in each of the seasons.  We will miss our family here in Ontario but the good thing is we will have Christmas with them when we return … double the fun, double the food.

I’m sharing with  Saturday’s Critters  and  Mosaic Monday.

the gardener side at craftygardener.ca

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