Focus on the Fence

Focus on the Fence

It is time to compare the fence garden from 2012 to 2013.  This image was taken a bit later in the month last year but is still good for comparison.

2012augsept

It was dry last year, as you can tell by all the brown leaves that dropped from the poplar trees at the back of the garden.  Some of the plants had already been cut back.

201308hh

Here is the garden this year … plants are taller, changes in the garden whimsy.  The wanna be grass or green stuff as I refer to it has just been cut so the brown leaves aren’t as evident, but they are still falling due to the dryness in August.

201308jj

The beebalm and heliopsis are almost finished blooming, just the odd one to open now.  The sedum looks to be at about the same stage as last year.

201308ii

This is a part of the fence garden that I rarely show.  There are 3 composters hiding behind the fence.  This area is under going some changes as a garden shed is going up in this area and won’t be room for the composters.  So they are being emptied and relocated to another area of the garden.  The lovely soil from the composters is going to the garden, to fill in some holes where some rocks were removed and to fill in a bit of a dip in the ground which will have a platform built on it to be the new home of my plant tables.

The plants in the gardens and containers are in varying stages of blooms.  I’ve grouped them into stages (my names) and can move them around each week as they progress.  This is a good reference for me to look back at next year for comparison. Some plants are in 2 areas … example is coreopsis because it is blooming but with continual deadheading it is also budding

leafy and growing – yucca,  peruvian daffodils, coleus, hostas,

Budding –sedum,  coreopsis,  4 o’clocks, hosta (pale green leaves)

Blooming –   roses (bush), rudbekia,  fuchsia,  coreopsis, clematis,  echinacea, nasturtiums, golden goblin blanket flower, 4 o’clocks (pink, yellow, variegated), feverfew, cosmos, climbing beans, miscanthus,  zinnias,   garlic chives, lets streak hosta,

Fading blooms –  climbing roses,  pansies, hostas, beebalm, liatris,  petunias, canna

Seeding – lunaria, orange cosmos,

Harvesting –Egyptian Walking onions, tomatoes, beans

Blooms finished. leaves flourishing – iris, lily of the valley,  early yellow daylilies,  bleeding heart, columbine, dianthus, evening primrose, ninebark, creeping jenny,  oxeye daisies, honeysuckle vine,  lavender, ditch lilies, Bressingham Blue hosta, astillbe, coral bells, lady’s mantle, weigela, daylilies,  shasta daisies,

Vanished till next year – tulips, daffodils, poppies, yellow molly alliums, trilliums,  drumstick allium,

I’m sharing with Cottage Garden Party and Fertilizer Friday

More from The Gardener Side

plants … seed info … veggies & herbs … bulbs, corms, tubers

the gardens  … whimsy in the garden

Garden Update Mid August

Garden Update Mid August

I’ve missed a couple of weeks of garden updates while our family was visiting.  But for the past couple of days the weather has been wonderful for working outside and I’ve been trimming, deadheading and planning what to move and to where.  It is still so dry to move anything yet, but when the weather and soil is right I’ll know just what I need to do.  I”ve also been taking some photos of the various parts of the garden and of some of the plants that are blooming.

The Let’s Streak hosta is just starting to bloom.  There are several flower stalks for the next little while.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The white obedient plants have been blooming for awhile and the mauve ones have the budding stalks so should be blooming soon.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The shady north facing garden is still looking good.  The sedum is just starting to blush.  I love all the greens and patterns of the leaves.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

In the sunny front diamond garden the millet grass and yucca have shown lovely growth.  My yucca, which was new last year, has hairy bits on the leaves, so hopefully that will mean some blooms for next year.

The ground is so very, very dry and we really could do with a good soaking rain.  The evenings have cooled down considerable, only 10 Celsius last night.  But the days are free of humidity, just wonderful for relaxing or working in the garden.

I’m sharing  with Cottage Garden Party and Fertilizer Friday.

The plants in the gardens and containers are in varying stages of blooms.  I’ve grouped them into stages (my names) and can move them around each week as they progress.  This is a good reference for me to look back at next year for comparison. Some plants are in 2 areas … example is coreopsis because it is blooming but with continual deadheading it is also budding

leafy and growing – yucca,  peruvian daffodils, coleus,

Budding –sedum, hollyhocks, beans, coreopsis,  4 o’clocks, garlic chives

Blooming –   roses (bush), rudbekia, petunias,  fuchsia,  coreopsis, clematis,  echinacea, nasturtiums, golden goblin blanket flower, 4 o’clocks (pink, yellow, variegated), feverfew, cosmos, canna, climbing beans, miscanthus,  zinnias, daylilies

Fading blooms –  climbing roses,  pansies, hostas, shasta daisies, beebalm, liatris

Seeding – lunaria, orange cosmos,

Harvesting –Egyptian Walking onions, tomatoes, beans

Blooms finished. leaves flourishing – iris, lily of the valley,  early yellow daylilies,  bleeding heart, columbine, dianthus, evening primrose, ninebark, creeping jenny,  oxeye daisies, honeysuckle vine,  lavender, ditch lilies, Bressingham Blue hosta, astillbe, coral bells, lady’s mantle, weigela,

Vanished till next year – tulips, daffodils, poppies, yellow molly alliums, trilliums,  drumstick allium,

More from The Gardener Side

plants … seed info … veggies & herbs … bulbs, corms, tubers

the gardens  … whimsy in the garden

The Windmill Garden in August

The Windmill Garden in August

I’m rather later with my weekly garden review this week.  We have family visiting from British Columbia so my days are spent enjoying 2 little grandchildren and their parents.  I don’t have lots of photos to share of the garden but have taken time to update my plant growth.  I’ve been using scheduled posts every couple of days but will be back to regular postings at the end of the week.

An extra pair of strong hands and muscles helped move an old cement fountain from the garage into the windmill garden.  It comes apart into 4 pieces and the bottom piece was so heavy it had to be put on a cart and wheeled into the garden.  This belonged to my son in laws grandmother who has recently moved into a nursing home and it has been re-homed in our garden.  It no longer works as a fountain but will be turned into some sort of planter.  I’m visualizing trailing plants on the bottom layer and some succulents in the middle layer.  If you have any good ideas as to what to grow in the fountain please share your ideas.

cement fountain1

The windmill garden is one area that I’ve been working on this year.  This is not an ‘in the ground’ garden but an ‘on the ground’ garden.

windmillgdnjuly1

The big pot of nasturtiums is blooming really well.  There are pink and orange cosmos behind the fountain, some obedience plants starting to bloom to the left hand side, some coreopsis and rudbekia in bloom, and one little sunflower compliments of the chipmunk.  The ditch lilies to the back right and the yellow daylilies to the front right have finished blooming for this year.  On the plant table there are 2 large totes with canna growing in them and the lovely red blooms are just starting to open up.  The mailbox is where the bluejays pick up their peanut mail.  A few pieces of garden art can be found in this garden … the gazing ball, the birdbath totem, and Mr Potts.

I’m sharing  with Fertilizer Friday.

The plants in the gardens and containers are in varying stages of blooms.  I’ve grouped them into stages (my names) and can move them around each week as they progress.  This is a good reference for me to look back at next year for comparison. Some plants are in 2 areas … example is coreopsis because it is blooming but with continual deadheading it is also budding

leafy and growing – yucca,  peruvian daffodils, cosmos, garlic chives, coleus,

Budding –sedum, hollyhocks, beans, coreopsis, daylilies,  4 o’clocks

Blooming –   roses (bush), rudbekia, petunias,  fuchsia,  coreopsis, clematis,  shasta daisies, echinacea, beebalm, liatris, nasturtiums, golden goblin blanket flower, 4 o’clocks (pink, yellow, variegated), feverfew, cosmos, canna, climbing beans, miscanthus,  zinnias,

Fading blooms –  climbing roses, weigela,   pansies, hostas

Seeding – lunaria,  feverfew

Harvesting –Egyptian Walking onions, tomatoes, beans

Blooms finished. leaves flourishing – iris, lily of the valley,  early yellow daylilies,  bleeding heart, columbine, dianthus, evening primrose, ninebark, creeping jenny,  oxeye daisies, honeysuckle vine,  lavender, ditch lilies, Bressingham Blue hosta, astillbe, coral bells, lady’s mantle,

Vanished till next year – tulips, daffodils, poppies, yellow molly alliums, trilliums,  drumstick allium,

More from The Gardener Side

plants … seed info … veggies & herbs … bulbs, corms, tubers

the gardens  … whimsy in the garden

Goodbye July

Goodbye July

~

July is coming to an end.  What a month it has been … heat, humidity, thunder, brief downpours, but no steady rain.

Last Friday night we had terrific thunder and wind storms.  Thankfully that took away the awful humidity and left us with temperatures around 25 Celsius … so much better for being outside.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
homegrown veggies

Harvesting the veggies is in full force this week.  Yummy sweet tomatoes and fresh green beans.  Nothing tastes better than home grown.

2013daylilies1
daylilies

The wonderful daylilies are coming into full bloom … the yellows, peaches, reds, pinkish.

front tipsy1
tipsy pots

The tipsy pots are still doing really well and needed watering once and sometimes twice a day in the awful heat we just had.  The rudbekia is doing really well.  The front wanna be grass is drying right out and won’t need cutting this week.

shadynorth1
front shade garden

In the shady north garden the hosta blooms have been amazing.

sunnynorth1
front garden

The sunny north part of the garden is beginning to turn to mauve and purple as the coneflowers and liatris bloom.  The garden beds are getting very dried out due to lack of rainfall.

july 4 oclocks1
4 o’clocks

New blooms to open this week are the 4 o’clocks.  So far there are yellow, light pink, dark pink and the variegated pink and yellow.  There are many more buds so a promise of lots more blooms.

2013julyfullmoon
July moon

The evenings have been clear and viewing the July full moon has been spectacular.  The native people referred to this moon as the buck moon as it is at this time of the year that young bucks begin to grow their antlers.  They also called it the thunder moon as thunder storms are prevalent during July.  The weather in the past week or so has been full of thunder storms.  This info came from the Farmers Almanac.

2013moonjuly6
July moon

On Wednesday morning the moon was visible in the west against a clear blue sky.

2013moonjuly5
July moon

Yesterday was a wonderful day for working outside.  All the ditch lilies got the flower stalks cut off.  The coreopsis got a long overdue deadheading.  One clump of rudbekia has just about finished but 3 others are doing really well.  A few feverfew blooms have been trimmed off.  One of the miscanthus is sending up a plume.  They were slow to start over the winter but hopefully have established themselves now.

The plants in the gardens and containers are in varying stages of blooms.  I’ve grouped them into stages (my names) and can move them around each week as they progress.  This is a good reference for me to look back at next year for comparison. Some plants are in 2 areas … example is coreopsis because it is blooming but with continual deadheading it is also budding

leafy and growing – yucca,  peruvian daffodils, cosmos, garlic chives, coleus, canna, climbing beans, miscanthus

Buddingsedum, hollyhocks, zinnias, beans, coreopsis, daylilies, venedium, 4 o’clocks

Blooming –   roses (bush), rudbekia, petunias,  fuchsia,  coreopsis, clematis,  pansies,  shasta daisies, echinacea, hostas, beebalm, liatris, nasturtiums, golden goblin blanket flower, 4 o’clocks (pink, yellow, variegated), feverfew

Fading blooms – honeysuckle vine, climbing roses, weigela,  astillbe, coral bells, lady’s mantle, drumstick allium, lavender, ditch lilies, Bressingham Blue hosta

Seeding – lunaria,  feverfew

Harvesting – peas, Egyptian Walking onions, tomatoes, beans

Blooms finished. leaves flourishing – iris, lily of the valley,  early yellow daylilies,  bleeding heart, columbine, dianthus, evening primrose, ninebark, creeping jenny,  oxeye daisies,

Vanished till next year – tulips, daffodils, poppies, yellow molly alliums, trilliums

Seeking Shade

Seeking Shade

Mid July … the heat and humidity continues … and the gardens are looking wonderful despite the extreme heat.  Thank goodness for heat tolerant and drought resistant plants.

backgdnsjuly1

I haven’t been doing much outside, except watering the veggies and the pot gardens in the early morning and seeking shady spots to sit.  This photo was taken about 6:30 am this morning and it was already humid and sticky outside.

shady veggies1

Even the plant tables laden with the veggies are getting a little shade pampering.  This is a south facing garden and this corner is a sun trap.  So to give the plants a little extra shade during these hot, hot afternoons I’ve added a couple of umbrellas to the ends of the table.  My wonderful hubby drilled holes in the last plank of wood and the umbrella slots right through.  I know, I know … who shades their garden?  Tomatoes and other veggies grow in farmers fields without any protection.  But I have noticed that the leaves look a little worse for wear in all that direct sun.  In fact I know several gardeners who place umbrellas throughout their gardens to give a little more shade.

While outside this morning I picked a few more peas and the first of the sweet juicy little tomatoes.

squirrel hammock

Even the squirrel has taken to relaxing in the hammock in the shade under the trees at the back of the garden …

rabbit relax

… and the rabbit is stretching out in the cool shade by a big spruce tree.

I’m sharing  with Cottage Garden PartyNature Notes and Camera Critters.

The plants in the gardens and containers are in varying stages of blooms.  I’ve grouped them into stages (my names) and can move them around each week as they move through the stages.  This is a good reference for me to look back at next year for comparison.  Plants don’t bloom in alphetical order so they aren’t listed in any particular order.  Some plants are in 2 areas … example is coreopsis because it is blooming but with continual deadheading it is also budding

leafy and growing, no blooms yet

yucca,  peruvian daffodils, venedium, cosmos, garlic chives, coleus, canna

Budding

sedum, hollyhocks, zinnias, beans, coreopsis, daylilies,

Blooming

 ditch lilies,  roses (bush), rudbekia,  coral bells,  petunias,  fuchsia,  coreopsis, Bressingham Blue hosta, clematis, feverfew, pansies, lady’s mantle, lavender,  shasta daisies, echinacea, hostas, beebalm, liatris, drumstick allium, nasturtiums

Harvesting

peas, Egyptian Walking onions, tomatoes,

Fading blooms

honeysuckle vine, climbing roses, weigela,ninebark,  creeping jenny, astillbe,

Seeding

lunaria,  oxeye daisies

Blooms finished. leaves flourishing

iris, lily of the valley,  early yellow daylilies,  bleeding heart, columbine, dianthus, evening primrose, ninebark

Vanished till next year

tulips, daffodils, poppies, yellow molly alliums, trilliums

Gardens in July

Gardens in July

The second week of July is coming to an end.  This has been a hot and humid week with bursts of rain and oppressive humidity.

I’ve never seen so many hosta flower stalks as this year.  Several are going to bloom at the same time. Perhaps it was the wet spring that helped them along.

hostabuds13g

The nasturtiums are starting to bloom.   I had to replant this big pot a couple of times thanks to the squirrel or the chipmunk but some orange blooms appearing.

2013 nasturtiums1

The scarlet runner beans have masses of red blooms as well.  And where the blooms are falling off tiny green beans are appearing.

2013 scarletrunnersblooms1

I’ve been picking and munching on the fresh peas.  At the rate I’m eating them there won’t be enough for a dinner.  I also love adding fresh peas to my salad.  And some of the tomatoes are starting to turn a pinkish/reddish colour.

The many colours and patterns on the leaves of the coleus are gorgeous.  These are growing in the tipsy pots in the shady north garden and in a big pot by the front door.

2013coleus1

In the fence garden there is just a bit of the fence visible.  The heliopsis and Jerusalem artichokes have grown taller than the fence.  The day lily blooms are also taller than the fence.  There is a mallow plant (pink blooms) that has grown through the day lilies reminding me it is still there. There is beebalm towards the back of the garden that is starting to bud.  In another week or so I’ll be posting the comparison of this garden between 2012 and 2013.

fence gdn 2013july8

This is a time in the garden when some plants start to look overgrown.  The only maintenance now is deadheading the coreopsis and other plants, trimming back a few plants that have finished blooming, especially the oxeye daisies before they drop their seed everywhere.  I’m also seeing where some plants will need to be moved due to over crowding but it is too hot to do that right now.

I’m sharing  with Cottage Garden Party and Fertilizer Friday.

The plants in the gardens and containers are in varying stages of blooms.  I’ve grouped them into stages (my names) and can move them around each week as they move through the stages.  This is a good reference for me to look back at next year for comparison.

Budding – lavender, liatris, drumstick allium, sedum, echinacea, hostas, hollyhocks, hostas, beebalm

Blooming -astillbe, ditch lilies,  roses (bush), rudbekia,  coral bells, weigela,  petunias,  fuchsia, evening primrose, coreopsis, Bressingham Blue hosta, creeping jenny, clematis, feverfew, pansies, lady’s mantle, lavender,  shasta daisies

Fading –  honeysuckle vine, oxeye daisies, ninebark, climbing roses

Seeding – lunaria,  oxeye daisies

Green leaves (seed pods trimmed off or no blooms this year)  – iris, lily of the valley, yellow daylilies, yucca, bleeding heart, columbine, dianthus,

Vanished till next year – tulips, daffodils, poppies, yellow molly alliums,

More from The Gardener Side

plants … seed info … veggies & herbs … bulbs, corms, tubers

the gardens  … whimsy in the garden