Archives for perennials

F for Feverfew

Feverfew, Tanacetum parthenium, is a perennial medicinal herb …. a little plant with leaves that have an amazing scent.  This is a volunteer plant in my garden, perhaps the previous owners of the house planted it here but it just pops up every year and in a multitude of places. If you rub the leaves of this plant and then sniff your fingers it is supposed to relieve headache pains.  There are many other uses from reducing fever to easing toothache.  It is used as extracts, capsules, and in tea form.  I haven’t tried any of these remedies but I’m always
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H for Heliopsis

Heliopsis, a perennial, is a member of the daisy family.  ‘Helios’ for sun and ‘opsis’ for appearance.  It is a native plant in North and South America and often called False Sunflower.  There are some different varieties but all are quite similar. The buds start forming around the end of June and the mustard yellow blooms start to appear at the beginning of July. If you deadhead the spent blooms you will have a long bloom season.  Leaving some spent blooms on the plant will mean it will drop seeds and you will find some volunteer plants the next year.
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Susan with the Brown Eyes

I love taking macro photos and here are some of the rudbekia that is blooming. I love this native/wildflower that grows in the garden each year. This is a plant that takes care of itself … doesn’t mind the heat,  doesn’t mind if it doesn’t get much water, isn’t particular about soil conditions. These are also known as brown eyed Susan. A native plant that looks great in any garden. I’m sharing with Macro Monday and I ♥ Macro          More from The Gardener Side plants … seed info … veggies & herbs … bulbs, corms, tubers the gardens  … whimsy in the garden
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E for Evening Primrose

Evening primrose, or Sundrop, is a lovely, quick spreading perennial plant for the garden.  My Oenothera is the yellow variety but it does come in other colours (pink, white).  It is not related to the primrose family of plants In large clumps they provide spectacular colour. from late June onwards. In the spring the new florets appear in the garden.  Who knew they would grow to be at least 35 cm or more tall? It quickly starts its upward growth and the leaves start to turn green. You can just see a bit of the first red leaves at the very
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Peonies in Macro

The Sarah Bernhardt peonies have really pleased me this year.   Last year I received 3 dry peony roots from Veseys.  In the spring when they arrived I planted them into large pots to see if they would grow.  Then towards the end of summer I tansplanted them into a spot in the garden, at the base of the deck stairs and beside the rose trellis. I kept close watch on them after the winter looking for shoots poking through the ground.   All 3 of them survived the winter and grew.       Having seen how big and
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Solomon Seal in Macro

I just love taking macro photos of the blooms.  Solomon Seal can be tricky to photograph as the little white blooms hang downward.  They open up after a few days to reveal a lovely green colouring on the edges.   I did have to cheat a little for some of these photos and I snipped off part of a stem so I could get really up close and personal. The photos can speak for themselves today These photos were taken with the super macro setting on my Olympus camera … shutter speed 1/80 … AV 4.4 … shutter speed 1/80
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